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Show Your Work : 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered

Show Your Work : 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered

Date read: 2020-11-30
How strongly I recommend it: 8.16/10
(See my list of books, for more.)

Go to the Amazon book for details and reviews.

Show Your Work : 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered

Document what you do

“turn the invisible into something other people can see”

“Become a documentarian of what you do. Start a work journal”

“Whether you share it or not, documenting and recording your process as you go along has its own rewards: You’ll start to see the work you’re doing more clearly and feel like you’re making progress. And when you’re ready to share, you’ll have a surplus of material to choose from.”

Use the network for networking

“instead of maintaining absolute secrecy and hoarding their work, they’re open about what they’re working on, and they’re consistently posting bits and pieces of their work, their ideas, and what they’re learning online. Instead of wasting their time “networking,” they’re taking advantage of the network. By generously sharing their ideas and their knowledge, they often gain an audience that they can then leverage when they need it—for fellowship, feedback, or patronage.”

Remember your death

“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything—all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure—these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked.”

—Steve Jobs”

“When George Lucas was a teenager, he almost died in a car accident. He decided “every day now is an extra day,” dedicated himself to film, and went on to direct Star Wars.”

“I’m not going to sit here and wait for things to happen, I’m going to make them happen, and if people think I’m an idiot I don’t care”

Thinking about death every morning makes me want to live.”

What to share

“Once a day, after you’ve done your day’s work, go back to your documentation and find one little piece of your process that you can share.

Where you are in your process will determine what that piece is.

If you’re in the very early stages, share your influences and what’s inspiring you.

If you’re in the middle of executing a project, write about your methods or share works in progress.

If you’ve just completed a project, show the final product, share scraps from the cutting-room floor, or write about what you learned.

If you have lots of projects out into the world, you can report on how they’re doing—you can tell stories about how people are interacting with your work.”

A daily dispatch is even better than a résumé or a portfolio, because it shows what we’re working on right now.”

“The form of what you share doesn’t matter. Your daily dispatch can be anything you want—a blog post, an email, a tweet, a YouTube video, or some other little bit of media.”

Social media sites are the perfect place to share daily updates. Don’t worry about being on every platform; pick and choose based on what you do and the people you’re trying to reach.”

Post as though everyone who can read it has the power to fire you.”

“Be open, share imperfect and unfinished work that you want feedback on, but don’t share absolutely everything”

Personal website as a self-invention machine

“Don’t think of your website as a self-promotion machine, think of it as a self-invention machine”

“Fill your website with your work and your ideas and the stuff you care about”

Learning in front of others

“The world is changing at such a rapid rate that it’s turning us all into amateurs.”

“The best way to get started on the path to sharing your work is to think about what you want to learn, and make a commitment to learning it in front of others.”

Document what I do

“turn the invisible into something other people can see”

“Become a documentarian of what you do. Start a work journal”

“Whether you share it or not, documenting and recording your process as you go along has its own rewards: You’ll start to see the work you’re doing more clearly and feel like you’re making progress. And when you’re ready to share, you’ll have a surplus of material to choose from.”